Saint Louis University Course Descriptions

ENGLISH/LITERATURE


Saint Louis University

ENGLISH

ENGL 150     The Process of Composition (Required)

Develops effective personal and expository prose writing skills, including methods of invention, organization, audience analysis, and style. Focuses on the compositional process.

 

ENGL 190     Advanced Strategies of Rhetoric and Research (Required)

Studies complex structures of language including its logical and persuasive possibilities.  Emphasizes analytical reading, critical thinking, and research methodology skills.  Prerequisite: ENGL-150, or equivalent.
 
ENGL 202     Introduction to Literary Study
Introduces students to theoretical and methodological approaches to literary texts, including major terms, methods, and concepts.
 
ENGL 220     Introduction to Poetry
Introduces students to theoretical and methodological approaches to poetry, including major terms, methods, and concepts.
 
ENGL 230     Introduction to the Novel
Introduces students to theoretical and methodological approaches to the novel, including major terms, methods, and concepts.
 
ENGL 240     Introduction to Drama
Introduces students to theoretical and methodological approaches to drama, including major terms, methods, and concepts.
 
ENGL 260     Introduction to the Short Fiction
Introduces students to theoretical and methodological approaches to short fiction, including major terms, methods, and concepts.
 
ENGL 305     Creative Writing:  Poetry
An introduction through reading and writing to common poetic forms.
 
ENGL 311     American Short Story
Studies short stories by nineteenth and twentieth-century American authors, to show the unity and diversity of the form from the beginning to the present.
 
ENGL 320     British Literary Traditions I:  Beginnings – 1800
Examines representative works of medieval, renaissance, restoration, and eighteenth century British literature in light of historical and cultural developments.
 
ENGL 321     British Literary Traditions II:  1800 – Present
Examines representative works of nineteenth and twentieth century British literature in light of major historical and cultural developments.
 
ENGL 328     American Literary Traditions I:  Beginnings – 1865
Examines representative works in American literature from the beginnings to 1865 in light of major historical and cultural developments (Fall semester).
 
ENGL 329     American Literary Traditions II:  1865 – Present
Examines representative works in American literature from1865 to the present in light of major historical and cultural developments (Spring semester).
 
ENGL 347     Introduction to Shakespeare
Examines a selection of Shakespeare’s major works with a focus on his appeal as a popular author as well as his achievement as a major poet and craftsman.
 
ENGL 370     The Bible & Literature
Studies poems and narratives from scripture, e.g., Genesis, the Psalms, and the Gospels, with attention to literary works based on the Bible.
  
HISTORY
 
HIST 111     Origins of the Modern World to 1500 (Required)
An historical approach to understanding the modern world to 1500.  The course will examine ancient civilizations, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, Christianity, Islam, Byzantium, the Middle Ages. The Renaissance, and encounters between cultures and regions of the globe.
 
HIST 112     Origins of the Modern World, 1500 to the Present (Required)
An historical approach to understanding the development of the modern world from 1500 to the present.  The course will examine the cross-cultural impact of European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Scientific Revolution, absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French and Industrial Revolutions, nineteenth and twentieth century thought, the World Wars, totalitarian and liberation movements, and the challenges of the new global age.
 
HIST 260     History of the United States to 1865
This survey course examines the development of the United States from its pre-Columbian origins through the Civil War.
 
HIST 261     History of the United States since 1865
This survey course examines the United States from Reconstruction through the present.
 
HIST 300     Ancient Greece
The history of the Greek people from the Mycenaean period to the Hellenistic Age.
 
HIST 301     Ancient Rome
The political, social and cultural history of Rome from the beginning of time to the time of Julius Caesar.
 
HIST 303     The Byzantine Empire
This course examines the waning years of the Roman Empire in the West and the subsequent millennium of its history in the East.  Also examined are Byzantine politics, culture, and society as well as Byzantine interactions with the Islamic East and Catholic West.
 
HIST 304     The Middle Ages to 1100
Political, ecclesiastical, and cultural developments in Europe from the collapse of Rome in the West to the struggle of empire and papacy.
 
HIST 305     The Middle Ages 1100 to 1450
The High and Late Middle Ages from the rise of universities to the fall of Constantinople.
 
HIST 309     The Age of the Renaissance
The political, social and cultural influences which brought the medieval period to a close and prepared the way for a new European society.
 
HIST 310     The Reformation Era
The religious crisis of the age against the background of political, economic and intellectual change, 1500-1600. 
 
HIST 345     Colonial America
Surveys of the foundations of the colonies, development of government structures, as well as social structures up to the Revolution. Although emphasis is on the English colonies, French and Spanish North American colonies will also be included.
 
HIST 346     Foundations of the American Republic, 1763-1816
The American Revolution, the Constitution and the early years of the Republic.
 
HIST 361     Civil Rights in America, 1865-1965
This course examines the hundred-year struggle to secure civil rights for African-Americans from Reconstruction through the Civil Rights Movement. Students will examine the factors creating a racially segregated society and the efforts undertaken by civil rights groups to dismantle the Jim Crow Society.
 
LANGUAGES
(Spanish, French, German, Italian)
 
SPAN 110     Communicating in Spanish I
Introduction to Spanish language and culture.  Prepares students to operate within areas of immediate needs and simple situations.
 
SPAN 115     Communicating in Spanish II
Continuation of SPAN-110. Prepares the student to function in simple situations related to personal interests and daily life.
 
SPAN 210     Intermediate Spanish: Language & Culture
Continued practice in all skills. Readings in and discussion of Hispanic Culture.
 
FREN 110    Communicating in French I
Course emphasizes the acquisition of communicative skills.
 
FREN 115    Communicating in French II
Continuation of FREN-110. Expansion of oral and written communication skills in areas of immediate needs, personal interests and daily life.
 
FREN 210     Intermediate French Language and Culture 
Continued practice in and development of all language skills, enabling the student to function in an increased number of areas. Materials and discussion relating to French culture.
 
GR 110        Communicating in German I
Emphasis on the acquisition of communicative skills.
 
GR 115        Communicating in German II
Continuation of GR-110. Expansion of all language skills, enabling the student to function in simple situations related to immediate needs, personal interests and daily life. Prerequisite: GR-110 or placement. 
 
GR 210         Intermediate German: Language & Culture
Continued practice in and development of all language skills, enabling the student to function in an increased number of areas. Materials and discussion relating to German culture. Prerequisite: GR-115 or placement.
 
ITAL 110      Communicating in Italian I
Introduction to Italian language and culture. Emphasis on acquiring communicative skills.
 
ITAL 115      Communicating in Italian II
Expansion of oral and written communication skills in areas of daily life and personal interest. Prerequisite: ITAL-110 or instructor consent.
 
ITAL 210      Intermediate Italian: Language & Culture 
Continued practice in all skills, enabling students. Reading in and discussion of Italian culture. Prerequisite: ITAL-115 or instructor consent.
 

MATHEMATICS

 

MATH 114     Intermediate Algebra I

 Radicals, exponents, first degree equations, simultaneous equations, quadratic equations, functions, graphs, logarithms, polynomials. Credit not given for both MATH-114 and any of the following: MATH-112 and MATH-113. Fall and Spring semester.
 
MATH 120     College Algebra
Polynomials, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, systems of equations, and inequalities. Prerequisite:  2 years of high school algebra.
 
MATH 122     Finite Mathematics
Linear equations and straight lines, matrices, sets and counting, probability and statistics, the mathematics of finance, and logic. Fall and Spring semeser. Prerequisite: Two years high school algebra.
 
MATH 132     Survey of Calculus
Introductory differential and integral calculus, optimization and rate problems, calculus of rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, partial derivatives and applications.  Prerequisite: MATH-120 or 3.5 years of high school mathematics.
 
MATH 141     Pre-Calculus
Trigonometric functions, graphing, identities, solving triangles, inverse trigonometric functions, polar coordinates, complex numbers, and analytic geometry. Credit not given for both MATH-141. Fall and Spring semester. Prerequisite: 3.5 years of high school mathematics or a grade of “C” or better in MATH-120.
 
MATH 142     Calculus I 
Elementary functions; differentiation and integration from geometric and symbolic viewpoints; limits, continuity; applications. Fall and Spring semester. Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics or a grade of “C” or better in MATH-141.
 
MATH 143     Calculus II 
Symbolic and numerical techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, infinite series, power series, Taylor series, differential equations; polar coordinates, applications. Fall and Spring semester. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in MATH-142.
 
NATURAL SCIENCES
(Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Biology, Chemistry, Physics)
 
EAS 107        Understanding the Weather 
A nonmathematical description of the processes that effect the weather are provided. Topics include solar radiation, horizontal and vertical structure of the atmosphere, atmospheric motions, and climate.
 
EAS 109        Climate & Humankind in History 
Treatment of the interaction of early people with the atmospheric environment on the basis of existing paleoclimatological evidence. Interplay between climate and civilization; recent historical events as related to contemporaneous climates. Course developed around the notions of weather systems and climates of various scales.
 
EAS 114        Earth History
Provides an introduction to the geologic origin and development of the earth; plant and animal inhabitants.
 
EAS 132        Natural Disasters
This inquiry-based course examines geologic processes that are sometimes hazardous to humans, including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and landslides. Each section of the course will include an analysis of the geologic processes, and will end by discussing specific examples of where, when and how each type of geologic process has proven hazardous, or resulted in a natural disaster.
 
EAS 133        Drifting Continents
This inquiry-based course introduces students to the theory of continental drift and plate tectonics, covers the general character of science, the history behind plate tectonics, how the theory explains the gross features and phenomena near the Earth’s surface, and current debates around plate tectonics.
 
EAS 136        Beauty of Atmosphere
The student understands the physical processes responsible for severe local storms, hurricanes, and winter storms. In addition to understanding the power behind these phenomena, the student marvels at the beauty of optical phenomena such as rainbows, halos, mirages, coronas and sundogs and inquires about the mechanism.
  
BIOL 114     Our Living Environment
Environmental problems treated within the framework of fundamental ecological principles.
 
BIOL 136     Concepts of Biology
A one-semester course covering scientific methodology and the basic concepts of biology ranging from the chemical to the ecological levels of organization.
 
BIOL 140     Biology of Health & Disease
Topics include: nature of life, chemical basis of life, basic foodstuffs, vitamins, diseases caused by microbes, plants, and animals, drugs and the mind, and biology and the future of humanity.
 
BIOL 146     Exercise and Health
The course will explore exercise metabolism, how the body responds and  adapts to exercise, and the health implications of physically active and sedentary lifestyles.
 
CHEM 100  Chemistry and the Environment
This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of chemistry and how these impact important environmental issues.  Topics include critical issues in energy use and sustainability, alimental cycles in the environment, atmospheric chemistry and pollution, the hydrosphere and water pollution, and the biosphere and persistent organic compounds.

 

PHYS 101     Physics and the World Around Us
This course introduces basic concepts of physics emphasizing the meaning of modern developments of the science.
 
PHYS 113     Introduction to Astronomy
This course covers modern concepts of the physical nature of the astronomical universe.
 
SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, and COMMUNICATIONS
(Psychology, Sociology, Political Science, Communications)
 
PSY 101        General Psychology (Required)
Provides a basic and general knowledge of the theoretical, scientific, and conceptual foundations of psychology, including biological, cognitive, emotional, developmental, cultural and social aspects. Includes key concepts and principles, methods for collecting and evaluating evidence, and application of psychological knowledge. This course is a prerequisite for all upper division courses.
 
PSY 310        Brain, Mind, and Society
This course examines features of the human mind that make it wholly different from the mental faculties of even our closest genetic relatives.  The biological origins of the brain, the shaping of the mind by culture, and the human capacity for morality and religiosity are among topics addressed.
  
PSY 316        Learning & Memory
Covers theoretical and applied perspectives of learning and memory. Topics include habituation, classical and instrumental conditioning, memory components and processes, and underlying neural mechanisms. Integrates these topics with their application to daily functioning, with special emphasis on attention and motivation. Prerequisite: PSY-101 for all upper division courses.
  
PSY 330        Social Psychology
Introduction to the scientific study of social behavior focusing on how people relate to, think about, and influence each other. Topics include attitude formation and change, social cognition, conformity, group decision-making, aggression, altruism, prejudice, and interpersonal attraction and relationships. Prerequisite: PSY-101 for all upper division courses.
  
PSY 331        Personality Theory
Dominant personality theories of Freud, Jung, Adler, Skinner, Maslow, Rogers, Kelly, etc., are presented within a historical and contemporary context. Emphasis on application of theory to personal situations through small group discussions and student log.  Prerequisite: PSY-101 for all upper division courses.
 
SOC 110       Introduction to Sociology
This introductory course emphasizes fundamental concepts in sociology and their application to contemporary society for the purpose of enhancing the students understanding of the world in which they live.
  
SOC 120       Introduction to Anthropology
This course emphasizes the nature of humans and culture. Human prehistory, language and other basic concepts are examined from a cross-cultural perspective.
  
SOC 190       Introduction to Criminal Justice
An examination of the police, courts, prosecution, and correctional systems to provide a basic understanding of their organization and operation; also, an exploration of major criminal justice issues facing America today, such as police effectiveness, plea bargaining and the contradictions of the prison system.
  
SOC 222       Peace and Conflict
This course introduces students to social science perspectives on peace and conflict by examining cooperation and conflict in human society.  Cross cultural examples and examination of our evolutionary past reveal what is really “human nature.”
 
SOC 330       Social Psychology
Processes of social interaction and reciprocal influence which arise in and constitute groups.  Central emphasis is on self image and communication.
 
SOC 336       Racial & Ethnic Relations
This course provides an interpretive framework for examining the many issues associated with racial and ethnic identity.
 
CMM 120     Public Speaking (Required)
Students are introduced to principles of effective public speaking and provided with opportunities to develop public speaking skills. In addition, standards of evaluation for public communication are established for the use in evaluating their own and other’s public speaking performances.
 
CMM 200     Communication Theory
Examines the problems that communication researchers attempt to solve by theorizing effectively. Topics include the relation of theory to research and practice, and different ways of theorizing, such as covering laws, systems, and social constructionist approaches.
 
POLS 110      American Politics
Basic principles of American systems of government; relations of citizens to government; structure, organization, powers and procedures of governmental agencies.
 
POLS 150      Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course introduces students to the logic, method, and theoretical approaches of the comparative study of political systems and processes. It examines the institutions and processes of government in various kinds of political systems around the world, particularly liberal democratic systems in advanced industrial countries, communist systems and the process of transition out of communism, and developing countries.
 
POLS 151      Politics of the Developing World
This course is an introduction to the domestic policies of developing countries in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America.  Topics include democracy and authoritarianism, economic development, political conflict, the role of political institutions, and political culture.
 
POLS 160      Introduction to International Politics
Role of power, ethics, law, public opinion; effectiveness of various techniques of international relations; diplomacy, propaganda, subversion. Crucial problems. Proliferation of nuclear weapons, revolutionary warfare, hunger.
 
POLS 170      Foundations of Political Theory
Tracing of the development of a distinctive political realm in the history of Western political thought, from the ancient to the modern era. The class approaches political theories as more-or-less coherent systems of thought that assume often unexplored social underpinnings. The goal is to illuminate the relationship between politics and society in these theories.
 
FINE ART
(Art History, Art, Music, Theater)
 
ARTH 100     Approaching the Arts
Presents an introduction to the world of the visual arts with the goal of developing an understanding of important themes, functions, media, principles of design, and visual characteristics found in art.
 
ARTH 101     History of Art
This course presents a chronological survey of the major periods of art history (ancient, medieval, early modern, and modern) and introduces students to key concepts, terminology, analytical strategies, and critical questions relevant to understanding art.

ARTH 102     History of Architecture
This course introduces students to the history of architecture from the ancient world to the present, surveying major movements and concepts, important monuments and influential designs within a chronological framework. Students will gain competence in analyzing architecture as well as familiarity with basic issues and concerns.
 
ARTH 111     History of Western Art I
The course will present the development of western art and architecture from pre-historic times to the Middle Ages. Students will study artworks within the framework of art history methods such as formalism and social history.
 
ARTH 112     History of Western Art II
This course will present the development of western art and architecture from the Renaissance period to the present. Students will study artworks within the framework of art history methods such as formalism and social history.
 
ARTH 150     Life & Times of Michelangelo
Students will be introduced to Renaissance genius Michelangelo as painter, sculptor, architect, and poet. The artist and his art, including the Sistine Ceiling paintings and his Pietà, will be studied within the contexts of several methodologies including patronage, formalism, and social history.
 
ARTH 215     Saints in Art
Through paintings, sculptures, and civic dedications of buildings, chapels, and cities, students will learn about the role of saints in the Catholic Church. Saints in art will be presented in a chronological plan, beginning with Early Christian virgins and martyrs, then following waves of sainthood in the middle ages and early modern periods to saints currently being canonized.
 
ARTH 220     The Art of Rome
The great art and monuments of the Eternal City of Rome will be presented from five major periods: Antiquity, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque/Rococo, and Modern.  Artworks will be studied within the context of social history, formalism, and other art history methodologies.
 
ARTH 230     Ancient Art Survey
This course will focus on the art and architecture of the great civilizations of antiquity, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the formalistic, historical, and theoretical aspects of artworks.
 
ARTH 240     Medieval Art Survey
Examining artworks from the 4th to the 14th centuries, this course introduces students to the society and culture of the European middle ages. The religious, political, and social importance of images is examined within the broader themes of monasticism, feudalism, and scholasticism. Subtopics include pilgrimage, crusade, and literacy.
 
ARTH 250     Renaissance Art Survey
Students will be introduced to the art and architecture of the Renaissance, 1300-1600.  The artworks will be presented as products of the combined efforts of wealthy patrons, such as the Medici family and Pope Julius II, and talented artists, such as Botticelli and Michelangelo. Works of art will also be examined from formal, theoretical, and historical perspectives.
 
ARTH 260     Baroque and Rococo Art Survey
Introduces students to the arts of Europe and the Americas between 1560 and 1740.  Celebrated artists presented include Bernini, Caravaggio, the Gentileschi, Rembrandt, Rubens, and Velázquez, with attention paid to the religious functions of art, art’s role in the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, art and monarchy, art and nobility, and art as social commodity.
 
ARTH 270     Nineteenth-Century Art Survey
Introduces students to the arts of Europe and the United States from approximately 1780 to 1900, with an emphasis on major movements such as Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Art Nouveau.
 
ARTH 271     American Art Survey
This course introduces students to American Art from the colonies through the art being produced now. Special emphasis will be to understand the arts within European traditions that fostered them as well as the international exchange of ideas through the arts.
 
ARTH 401     Christian Iconography
An evaluation of the sign, symbols and content of religious art from the early Christian period into Modern times. Additional emphasis will be on the traditions and how they emerged.

 

ARTH 450     The Papacy & Art
An examination of the role of art in the service of the papacy with particular attention on the popes and patrons, especially in Rome after the return from Avignon.
  
ART 200        Drawing I
An introduction to the basic elements in drawing from observation. Line and mass as a means to explore objective and spatial concepts in various media.  A lab fee is required.
  
ART 210        Design
An introduction to the basic formal concepts in the two-dimensional arts: line, shape, value, color, texture, and the principles of organization.  A lab fee is required.
  
ART 220        Painting I
An introduction to the fundamentals of painting from observation: color, shape, spatial relationships, and materials related to the traditional practice of painting in oil.  A lab fee is required. 

  

ART 240        Ceramic Sculpture I
Clay is an ideal material for fundamental approaches in both sculpture and traditional ceramic applications, including throwing on a potter’s wheel, modeling, and constructing, along with the development of perceptual skills. Utilized throughout human history, clay continues to be a vital material for artistic creation.  A lab fee is required.
  
ART 250        Computer Art I
An introduction to the computer as an artistic medium. Students develop skill and fluency with graphic software as well as explore the distinct aesthetics of computers.  Lectures and research will strengthen student’s aesthetic vocabulary and deepen their understanding of political and cultural implications of electronic art. A lab fee is required.
  
MUSC 100     Approaching the Arts:  Music
Introduction to the appreciation and understanding of the basic elements, genres, and style periods of Western music. Classical and popular styles will be presented; some live concert attendance will be required.
  
MUSC 110    Music Fundamentals
An introductory course in music notation and the basic building blocks of western musical thought. Includes study of pitches, clefs, key signatures, scales, intervals, rhythms, symbols, terms, and basic harmony.
 
MUSC 201    Applied Music:  Voice

Private studio lessons in voice.  Variable credit course.  Music fee required.  Appropriate technical exercises and repertoire are assigned individually.  End of semester jury before a panel of music teachers is required.

 

MUSC 202    Applied Music: Piano

Private studio lessons in piano.  Variable credit course.  Music fee required.  Appropriate technical exercises and repertoire are assigned individually.  End of semester jury before a panel of music teachers is required.

 

THR 251       Acting I:  Fundamentals
Study in the principal theories of realistic acting is balanced with practice in experiencing character creation. Principles of physical and emotional character development are explored.
 
 
(Additional courses offered)